The Happy and Serious Sides of Life

The Happy and Serious Sides of Life

Time has a way of rolling away, going slowly or with lightning speed. All we can do is hold on to each hour and minute. First, the happy side, which is to introduce my first great-grandchild, Hope. She arrived on July 11th, twelve days after her official due date, weighing in at 9 pounds, 4 ounces, 21 inches long. The only sad spot was that her maternal grandfather, Carleton Harlow, who had passed away in early January, wasn’t there to greet her. Our comfort is the belief that he was present in spirit to share in the joy. What a ray of sunshine she brings with her into a very hard year. Welcome Hope!

On the serious side of life, I’m almost at the end of my chemotherapy for a rather aggressive form of breast cancer. I have one more treatment left and although I’ve had some unpleasant side effects, hope things will improve. My doctor lowered my two main drugs by 20% as he was concerned for my safety and has put me on an antibiotic regimen for the next eight days. This is to prevent any intestinal or bowel infection that could prove fatal. Another test is scheduled for today to check on heart function and again labs on Wednesday to monitor whether dropping hemoglobin, red cell count, or immune system readings will require action. I’ve had three blood transfusions over the past five treatments, so hope I won’t need anymore. However, I feel so much better after them that I won’t complain.

After my final chemo treatment in August, I will continue with my every third week herceptin infusions (a gene targeted medication delivered through my port) until the end of April next year. Radiation treatments will probably begin about mid-September. That requires daily trips across town to the Kaiser Oncology location for at least a month with only weekends off!

It seems like a long haul at times, but it’s worth the trips, tests, and record keeping of medications and symptoms to know that life is still beautiful.

I’m slowly continuing work on my latest book. Emaline is a child musical prodigy (circa early 1900’s) whose life is complicated by psychological twists and unexpected obstacles. My original working title was Through a Glass Darkly but am considering alternatives, such as Emaline. I’m at the 47 thousand-word count. Since one never quite knows how a story will stretch out in first draft, or conversely, how much will be condensed or cut, the length is still uncertain.

The arrival of Hope in my world, the sustaining support system of family, friends, and colleagues, coupled with the excitement of writing continues to beckon me to the future.

Published in: on July 24, 2012 at 10:02 am  Comments (17)  
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Every May I Remember Mama

Traveling back in memory to the little house on Hardcastle, I am once more safe in my mother’s arms. For she was the center of my Universe, and the sight of her could banish any grief or woe. Despite the availability of jobs during the war years, Mama chose to stay home and tend to her children. Practicing economies learned in the Depression, she made ends meet. She gave piano lessons and was not too proud to take in ironing or pick berries for local farmers. With these tiny earnings and a small stipend from my father, she provided a stable and happy home.

Though we never had much, we always had enough. And the finer things of life were never relinquished or abandoned. Mama was an accomplished musician, so often the strains of a Chopin etude or an old folk song would float out into the dusk of our summer yard where my brother and I whispered secrets and planned adventures. The combination of music and lamplight would draw us in just before bedtime, cheeks aflame with fresh air and exertion. When summer turned to fall and winter, Mama often read aloud. The Little House in the Big Woods was best remembered and, over the years, we collected the whole series. Laura and Mary and Pa and Ma were discussed as though they were family.

I also remember how no illness could long endure under Mama’s gentle ministrations. Her hand on my forehead, her dark eyes looking into mine, seemed to ease every symptom, and I knew I would soon be well. Now, as I face a serious health issue, it is easy to find tears filling my eyes. If only Mama were here, she would sit by my bedside, nurse me with simple but nourishing dishes, and best of all, touch my cheek and say, “There, there. You’ll be better in the morning.”

No matter how old we are, no matter how many years have passed, our mothers are never far from us. I recall a visit to a nursing home when I was very young. A long, bony figure of a man with hollowed cheeks and a sunken mouth lay upon a white cot. Eyes closed, he called, over and over, “Mother! Mother!”

At last I know why. For who will remember us when we grow old and infirm? Who but mother?

Published in: on May 12, 2012 at 10:54 am  Comments (10)  
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Life Happens When You’re Planning Something Else

The current year has been full of surprises, not all of them happy. And while I don’t want this blog to be a downer, I feel I should set the record straight in some regard.

If you’ve read my previous blog this year, you are aware of the death of my dear son-in-law, Carleton, on January 6. A traumatic event leaving behind grief, a complete reorganization and dissolution of life style for my daughter. An altogether sorrowful time which only the memory of his dear and presence can lighten.

After spending two weeks in Vermont with the family, I returned home and tried to get myself back on track. First on the list was scheduling my annual mammogram. Check off that item. But four days later I received a call from Kaiser. They needed to check their findings with an ultra-sound. I remember the thumping of my heart as I heard the message. It was that night that my husband said he felt a hard lump in my right breast. But I was in denial. I’ve had fibrous “lumps” before and besides I’d had stage 1 breast cancer 13 years ago in my left breast and have been clean every since. I had other things to do than revisit that scene.

Unfortunately there was no denying the x-rays and ultra sound screen presented after that second visit. Invasive ductile carcinoma, at least stage 2.
Next stop was a visit to the surgeon. I elected for a lumpectomy as it seemed it would take out the bad stuff and still leave me with something to fill my bra.

Surgery revealed that 12 of 14 lymph notes had cancer cells. An appointment was set with the medical oncologist and later with the radiology oncologist. A cat scan showed a couple of suspicious flecks elsewhere in my body, so meeting my new main doctor didn’t bring the best news. Best case scenario stage 3. The worst, 4th stage, or terminal.

With my daughter and husband with me, I thought I reacted rather well. No tears, no Oh My God, am I going to die remarks. Shock does wonderful things. Next came the Pet Scan which would zero in on those nasty “flecks” and reveal if they were simply artifacts or actual cancer.

Fortunately, the results were good. Stage 3, which means the cancer cells have migrated out of the original tumor and into the lymph nodes but no farther. That day I was euphoric. I had a chance. Within a day or so, relief spiraled into something more somber. My biggest fear was that I would suffer the horrendous nausea experienced after my first bout of chemo in 2000. My doctor assured me they would provide me with an arsenal of anti-nausea medications to prevent a recurrence. All I could do was pray they would work. Other than toothache, I can think of few things I dread more than vomiting.

But I now realize that a great blessing has come to me with an outpouring of love, encouragement, and prayers from family, friends, and colleagues. My daughter so newly widowed and in straightened circumstance, flew from Vermont, via Virginia, to spend 8 days with my husband and me. With Bill and Paige at my side, I was encouraged and supported. Ongoing concern, Reiki treatments, and offers of food from friends smoothed away many of my darker thoughts. It’s a beautiful thing to know that people genuinely care, that they are willing to write and send their healing energy to a friend in need, putting aside their own concerns to do so.

With renewed hope and strength, I’m actually getting back to writing on my current WIP, Emaline, and today I am breaking the blog barrier. Life does go on. Thank you all for being my companions and guides along this new trail.

Published in: on May 3, 2012 at 11:24 am  Comments (21)  
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THE ANATOMY OF A TELEVISION INTERVIEW

A look behind the scenes of any performance, be it stage, radio, or television holds a certain fascination. It was in the spirit of documenting an interview that I approached Cheri Lasota, author of Artemis Rising, and Veronica Esagui, author of The Scoliosis Self-Help Resource Book, Veronica’s Diaries and host for the television talk show, The Author’s Forum. Having received that permission, I want to introduce Veronica as she shares some thoughts about her approach to The Author’s Forum.

Veronica Esagui

“Once a guest is scheduled for an interview, I read their book or books, and compose questions as varied as the author’s genre. Most personal information is obtained from the author’s website or blog, or the back cover of the book. Some guests like to be surprised and leave the questions up to me, but others prefer to make a list of their own. Either way, it’s important to promote their work in the way they desire. The introduction and closing words are basically the same with every show. I like to help the authors relax, and try my best to make them smile before the lights and cameras go on.”

To give equal time to the author’s point of view, I asked Cheri what sort of preparations she made.

Cheri Lasota

“I spent most of my time choosing book excerpts, making sure they were short—a couple of minutes at most. I practiced reading slowly and as engagingly as possible. I wanted to emphasize the storyline rather than the mechanics of the delivery. I was pleased how Veronica drew attention to what makes my novel unique, both in terms of marketing strategies and setting.

During the taping, I felt quite relaxed, possibly due to my background in film. Since Veronica gave clear instructions as to what she needed and wanted, I tried to make sure my responses were genuine and not a “fake TV” image of myself. It was a lot of fun!”

Getting cameras & guest in position

Now I must mention the awesome staff at Willamette Falls Media Center studios. Karen Sorbel is both producer and editor, while Linda Jane Becker, operates the cameras. Linda wears headphone during the taping so that Karen can speak to her from the control booth overlooking the set.

Control screens

The main room itself is spacious, and contains several sets, including the one for The Author’s Forum. Three impressive cameras provide separate angles, and Linda receives directions from Karen in the control room. This technical tie-in is crucial for getting angles, close-ups, or broader views just right for the finished product. Screen shots must have smooth transitions from one speaker to another. During these preliminaries, bright flood lights are switched on.

View from the control booth

Host and guest are positioned in their respective set chairs to see how they fit together spatially. Because of differences in height, camera adjustments are necessary. Next, collar microphones are attached and checked for sound. The producer listens to voice levels to achieve the best mix of tone and audibility. The guest learns to look for the red light that indicates which camera is being used. The main advice, however, is to forget the cameras and speak as naturally as possible.

During this procedure, the question arose about the best way to display Cheri’s Apple iPad screen on camera. Because Artemis Rising was not yet available in print, Veronica hoped to show the book cover to the television audience. After several adjustments, the issue was resolved, and the countdown began. “Lights, action, camera.”

Ready to Roll

Veronica begins as the central camera’s red eye lights up, and the interview is underway. Cheri’s interview will be aired mid-April or so and will also be available on Veronica’s website.

Learn more about Artemis Rising or contact Cheri at http://www.cherilasota.com. The book is available in all digital formats and can be purchased at SpireHouseBooks.com, iTunes, Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, and KoboBooks.com.
Links etc.

Books by Veronica Esagui can be found at: bookstores, Amazon.com, Smashwords, and also directly from her website.

Meet A New Fantasy Author

Today I have the pleasure of featuring author, Laura Kentowski. Her debut novel, Guardian of Fate, has earned many positive reviews, mine included. Rather than try to tell you about this lovely lady, I’m going to step aside and let her do one of the things she does best. Write.

Laura, it is a privilege to welcome you to Alice’s Blog. So draw up a hypothetical chair and pour a virtual cup of tea. Tell us a little about yourself and how you manage to juggle a full time job with being a wife and mom.

Hi Everyone! First of all, I’d like to thank you, Alice, for having me here on your blog. It’s truly an honor.

I’m really your typical working wife and mother with a drive to push myself to exhausting limits. Five days out of the week I work as a corporate manager, come home to a whirlwind of a 5yr old, and eventually find a little quiet time late at night to delve into imaginary worlds with my writing. With the help of my husband, I’m sometimes able to sneak in more of my hobby if ideas can’t be ignored. Nothing beats the feeling of creating a whole new existence for my characters, even if I’m running on fumes.

Alice:  When did you first suspect that writing was your passion?

Laura:  I’ve been a big reader for as long as I can remember. I loved how my favorite authors had the ability to take me away from everything with their words, they still do. I can remember coming home with stacks of books that I could barely carry from the library, demolishing them within days, only to go back for my next stack. It wasn’t until I was about 12 that I attempted my own story. Something about a roller coaster, if I recall (twists and turns seem to be an overall theme in my writing – both figuratively and literally, now that I think of it). There were a few more stories here and there, but I was usually too wrapped up in school and friends to have the time for more. A year or so ago I started a book review blog as a way to combine my love of reading and writing. After about 4 months of that, I was compelled to write more. Short stories bloomed, until 1 idea took on novel proportions and I couldn’t stop. Writing became a ritual.

Alice:  Knowing that you graduated with a double major in Psychology and Criminal Justice, I’d love to know how those fields of study helped to shape Guardian of Fate.

Laura:  It’s funny because my first few novel ideas were psychological thrillers. Who knows, I still may use them some day. I’m a huge fan of twists and turns in novels and movies. I love finding ways to wow the psyche. By nature, I investigate everything with a need to figure things out. The human mind is an amazing entity that works in miraculous ways. If I can make a reader say, “Wow, I wasn’t expecting that!” then I feel that I’ve accomplished what I set out to do.

Alice:  When did the idea for your book first begin to take shape?

I was haunted by a recurring vision that my main character, Cassandra, was having. She didn’t know why (nor did I at the time) she was having it, but it was compelling. As I started looking more closely at her life, it began to unfold for both of us. There was no going back as we found out together how important her role in life was. Secrets were being kept by those she loved at the same time that mysterious entities came forward, and we had to find out why.

Alice:  Do you have a special place where you write?

Laura:  With all the havoc in my life, I take it where I can get it. Most times at night I’m camped out in the recliner with my laptop. Earphones plugged in to iTunes playlists or Pandora radio, keep the noisy drone of the outside world from creeping in.

Alice:  Do you keep a notebook for stray ideas or bits of dialogue or description?

Laura:  I have several: in my purse, on my phone, in my work bag, on my desk at work. Half the time I lose track of where I put all of them. Thankfully, I’m so anal that I transfer the ideas the minute I can to my writing program so they are not forgotten.

Alice:  Do you like to outline or just fly by the seat of your pants?

Laura:  I’ve tried so hard to be one or the other, but I’ve relented to the fact that I do both. Guardian Of Fate started by the seat of my pants for several chapters until I got stuck. Being new at the whole novel idea, I was devastated as to what I should do. I searched and searched for a way out, but couldn’t find anything that prompted me forward. One day I set out to outline and the ideas just started flowing again, but only so far. So I started writing it out in detail again, until the next block. Eventually it became a pattern: write, outline, write, outline. I vowed to outline my entire next book, but Seeker Of Fate seems to be headed in the same direction of the back and forth routine. What does that make me – a planter (panster/plotter)?

Alice:  Once your first draft is finished, what comes next? Do you let it sit and chill, or do you dive right in with revisions and edits?

Laura:  Again, this was a complete learning process for me. I was ready to dive right in with my revision and edits once Guardian Of Fate was finished, but I hit another cement wall. I’d start, but found myself looking for all the wrong things, not sure of what I needed to do – completely lost. Frustration set in and I found myself putting it off for about a month. Once I got back in, it was like the flow of writing again. I knew exactly what needed to change and kept at it until the end. It was definitely my least favorite part of the whole process.

Alice:  I think Guardian of Fate would make a great movie or TV series, especially since you’re already writing a sequel, Seekers of Fate. What are your thoughts on that?

Laura:  Ahhh, my dream put on a screen, how wonderful would that be. You know, I actually get this overwhelming euphoric feeling when I see other authors’ works come to life on TV and movies. I imagine how they feel to see their characters played out in front of their eyes – literally. Of course, I would love that to be my work someday. My only fear would be capturing the emotions of the characters just right. I’m a true believer that most books are 100 times better than even the most award-winning movies. It’s just so hard to get all of those important details portrayed in such a small amount of time. I think Guardian Of Fate has enough drama, action, and twists to be a movie (I’m just a bit biased), with much more to come in the forthcoming books in the series. I’m just chomping at the bit with more surprises for everyone! Seeker Of Fate is turning out to be just as tortuous with its twists and turns as GOF.

Laura, it’s been delightful to have you as a guest and learn the ins and outs of your writing incentives and techniques. I enjoyed reading Guardian of Fate and can’t wait for your next novel, Seeker of Fate.

Guardian of Fate is available in print and e-book through Amazon.com or at Barnes & Noble. It can also be downloaded in other formats for a variety of e-readers.

Read Laura’s blog at LJ Writes.

Published in: on February 7, 2012 at 8:51 am  Comments (6)  
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For Carleton…

When I wrote my farewell to 2011, I had no idea that a more painful goodbye was only days away. Because the loss of my daughter’s husband is still so close, I can only quote excerpts from the tribute composed by his children, parents, and siblings.

Carleton Harlow, born November 17th, 1952, son of David and Marge Harlow, passed away on January 6th, 2012 in Mt. Holly, Vermont. He married Paige Wilson-Kelly on April 20, 1984. He leaves behind his devoted wife and greatly loved children, Megan Harlow of Virginia, Kristance Harlow of the United Kingdom, and Joseph Harlow of Vermont.

Carl’s main passion and love was for his family. He was an avid outdoorsman who loved to fish. He will be remembered for his great sense of humor; he was always the funniest man in the room.

Whenever there is a family gathering, he will be missed, not only for his delicious barbecues and hilarious dance moves, but for his selfless, loving presence. Wherever there is a stream and fish to be caught, a clear night with stars to gaze at, or a moment that calls for a laugh, we will remember

Published in: on January 30, 2012 at 8:42 am  Comments (14)  
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Introducing the Indelibles

If you’re a fan of YA fiction, you’ve probably heard of the Tenners, the Elevensies, the Apocalypsies, and the Lucky 13s. Now marketing guru Shelli Johannes Wells has teamed up with twenty-four other indie and small press authors to bring you the Indelibles.

Who are the Indelibles?

“We are indie authors who write middle grade and young adult fiction. We are dedicated to leaving a permanent mark on the world with our stories and words. We are The Indelibles.”

Each week, they’ll explore fun, fabulous, and fierce topics for today’s teens, drawing on pop culture and themes from the books they write. Check out their official launch Monday, January 9th for fun giveaways at http://indeliblewriters.blogspot.com/. They’ll also be having a “blogger” chat on January 11th and a writer/author chat on the 18th to answer questions about self and indie pubbing. See their blog for details

Follow the Indelibles on Twitter.

Like the Indelibles on Facebook.

Published in: on January 9, 2012 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  
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A Death In The Family

Carleton Harlow, my beloved son-in-law, passed away on Friday, January 6.  I will be in Vermont with my daughter and her family until the end of the month. Thanks to those friends, family members, and colleagues who have sent me their sympathy and condolences.

Published in: on January 7, 2012 at 2:04 pm  Comments (17)  
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Good-bye to 2011

Like the two-faced god Janus, we look back at 2011, even as we look forward to the coming year.  Journalists, political pundits, and economists have already been hard at work analyzing the past year, and making predictions for 2012.

 

But public reflection aside, there is a personal summing up. We pat ourselves on the back for good deeds and good times, and excoriate ourselves for our failures and disappointments.

 

In my personal reckoning, I realize how little I would have accomplished in the past year without the love and encouragement of my family, friends, and colleagues. Thank-you for walking with me through challenge and self-doubt, for holding me up when I faltered, and for celebrating when things went right.

 

Wishing all of you a prosperous and happy new year!

Published in: on January 1, 2012 at 2:06 pm  Comments (18)  
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Introducing GETTING SIDEWAYS by Lisa Nowak

Today’s it’s my great pleasure to announce the launch of Getting Sideways, the second book of the Full Throttle series by Lisa Nowak, a rising star among young adult authors right here in Oregon. Lisa brings her experience as a stock car racer and mechanic to life through the eyes of her protagonist, Cody Everett. But this is more than a book about racing. It’s a book of navigating the sometimes rocky road to maturity.

Getting Sideways: Book 2 in the Full Throttle Series

Getting shipped off to live with his uncle Race was the best thing that ever happened to fifteen-year-old Cody. Then a wreck at the speedway nearly ruined everything. Cody’s making every effort to get his life back on track—writing for the school paper, searching for the perfect girlfriend, and counting the days until he gets his drivers’ license—but there’s no escaping the nightmares that haunt him.

A chance to build his own car seems like the perfect distraction. Until Cody realizes he’ll have to live up to Race’s legendary status. But that’s the least of his worries, considering he doesn’t have his dad’s permission. All he has to do is the impossible: keep Race from discovering his lie until he can convince his dad that racing’s safe.

Yeah, sure. That’ll be easy.

Haven’t read the first book? Running Wide Open is on sale now for 99 cents.

Running Wide Open: Book 1 in the Full Throttle Series

Cody Everett has a temper as hot as the flashpoint of racing fuel, and it’s landed him at his uncle’s trailer, a last-chance home before military school. But how can he take the guy seriously when he calls himself Race, eats Twinkies for breakfast, and pals around with rednecks who drive in circles every Saturday night?

What Cody doesn’t expect is for the arrangement to work. Or for Race to become the friend and mentor he’s been looking for all his life. But just as Cody begins to settle in and get a handle on his supercharged temper, a crisis sends his life spinning out of control. Everything he’s come to care about is threatened, and he has to choose between falling back on his old, familiar anger or stepping up to prove his loyalty to the only person he’s ever dared to trust.

Praise for Running Wide Open:

“It doesn’t matter if you are a racing fan or not, Running Wide Open will captivate you and capture your heart.” – Cari J, Amazon reviewer

“The roar of engines practically explodes off the page in this compelling, heart-thumping debut. Cody Everett is a straight-shooter with attitude, smarts, and whip-cracking wit; he doesn’t pull any punches, and neither does author Lisa Nowak. The collision of Cody and the world of stock car racing makes for a great story, one of the best I’ve read in a long time. Running Wide Open is a book not to be missed.” – Christine Fletcher, author of Tallulah Falls and Ten Cents a Dance

“The racing is easy to understand and does not get in the way of a rattling good story. I still couldn’t put it down on a re-read.” – Elisabeth Miles, Amazon reviewer

“We race stock cars during the summer and even though this is a recommended read for Young Adults, we are seniors and enjoyed every page. We can hardly wait for the sequel to come out. MUST READING!” – Maxci Jermann, Barnes and Noble reviewer

“I say read this book, it’s fun, it’s beautiful, it’s a very cool read that will give you a feel-good state of mind. Awesome read.” – L.E.Olteano, Butterfly-o-meter Books

Author Bio:

In addition to being a YA author, Lisa Nowak is a retired amateur stock car racer, an accomplished cat whisperer, and a professional smartass. She writes coming-of-age books about kids in hard luck situations who learn to appreciate their own value after finding mentors who love them for who they are. She enjoys dark chocolate and stout beer and constantly works toward employing wei wu wei in her life, all the while realizing that the struggle itself is an oxymoron.

Lisa has no spare time, but if she did she’d use it to tend to her expansive perennial garden, watch medical dramas, take long walks after dark, and teach her cats to play poker. For those of you who might be wondering, she is not, and has never been, a diaper-wearing astronaut. She lives in Milwaukie, Oregon, with her husband, four feline companions, and two giant sequoias.

Connect with Lisa online:

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